Rachel Hillman Foy - Hillman Homes



Posted by Rachel Hillman Foy on 1/3/2018

Being friendly with neighbors and others in your community can often open up doors -- both literally and figuratively -- and attract resources to you that were previously unavailable or unknown. Although networking is a term often associated with professional advancement, business marketing, or salesmanship, there are countless ways it can apply to your everyday life. While some people are ambivalent about the idea of using "small talk" as a conversation starter, you'd be surprised at how beneficial it can be in cultivating neighbor relationships, melting away social barriers, and discovering solutions to problems. Here are three ways that networking can benefit you and your family:

  1. Finding Contractors and Service Providers: If you own a home or are considering buying one, you're probably going to eventually need a variety of essential services, ranging from electrical repairs and plumbing to pest control and house cleaning. Having a network of people you can turn to for referrals, ideas, and suggestions can make a world of difference in your ability to find the best person or company for the job or project. When you can tap into the collective experiences of people you know and trust, you're expanding your resources immensely and gaining access to a wealth of valuable information.
  2. Parenting Solutions: If you're a parent (or planning to become one), you'll frequently be looking for resources and ideas for keeping your children entertained, busy, healthy, and challenged. By staying in touch and connected with other parents in your neighborhood, it can be much easier to discover family-oriented activities, educational programs, pediatricians, and child care services. Whether you're looking for a responsible baby sitter or a neighborhood playgroup, developing and maintaining an active social network can make your life easier and less frustrating.
  3. What's going on in the neighborhood? By making it a habit to engage your neighbors in "small talk", occasionally, you can pick up a lot of tips, ideas, and updates that can save you money, keep your family safe, or even help a neighbor in need. Keeping the lines of communication open can also help thwart residential crime and maintain the overall quality of life in your area. Being connected with people on your street creates a greater sense of community, which makes your neighborhood feel friendlier, safer, and more closely knit. There are also economic benefits to knowing your neighbors, such as learning about upcoming neighborhood yard sales you could participate in. You may also hear about beneficial things like group discounts, such as roofing services, driveway sealing, lawn mowing, or house painting.
Outside of your immediate neighborhood, it can also pay to join local parent groups, non-profit organizations, fitness clubs, and continuing education classes. While the concept of being a "lone wolf" may seem intriguing, mysterious, or romantic to some, people are meant to be social animals; they function best when bonding, working together, and sharing ideas. That's not to say that we don't all occasionally need our "alone time," but establishing a healthy balance between the two can help us enjoy the best of both worlds.




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Posted by Rachel Hillman Foy on 5/14/2013

Some people think that bigger is better even when it comes to buying a home. Before you buy the biggest house your budget allows you may want to consider if the size of the home is what will make you a happy homeowner. Besides the size of the home there are many other factors to consider, here are a few things you may want to think about when buying: Your Commute Often times a bigger home is one that has a longer commute. So would you choose a bigger home over a shorter commute? When considering a longer commute most home buyers significantly underestimate the negatives of a long commute like high stress levels, poorer health, and less active social lives.  Swiss economists, Bruno Frey and Alois Stutzer coined what they call “the commuters paradox”. They found that someone with a one-hour commute must earn 40% more money than someone who walks to work to be as satisfied with life. Community Another thing that can affect buyer satisfaction is the quality of a surrounding community Think about the community your home would be in. Is it a subdivision? Do you have to drive to get places? How far away are neighbors or stores? Walkable communities have more active residents, they are better for the environment and help us save money too. Studies have shown residents of a walkable neighborhood on average weigh 6 to 10 pounds less than someone in a car-dependent one. Walkable neighborhoods also give us more opportunities for social interaction. The more neighbors walk around the more involved they are in the community. Ultimately the more community involvement the happier people are.        







Rachel Hillman Foy